lareviewofbooks:

Keep realism weird! Brian Kim Stefans reviews Graham Harman’s Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy.

Even if Lovecraft were not writing philosophy proper, much of the coherence of his “cosmicism” results not in the noncontradictory material or technological universes typical of most science fiction — think of the droids and lightsabers that populate the world of Star Wars — but in a singularly fraught metaphysical universe. In Lovecraft’s version of reality, laws seem to function in ways that make our foundational certainties — Euclidean geometry, the private experience of dreams, the inviolable divisions between human, animal, plant, and the nonliving, etc. — merely contingent: just the way things appear to us, rather than absolute necessities.


Read the whole review here.

If you like Lovecraft, this is really quite interesting. —Km

lareviewofbooks:

Keep realism weird! Brian Kim Stefans reviews Graham Harman’s Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy.

Even if Lovecraft were not writing philosophy proper, much of the coherence of his “cosmicism” results not in the noncontradictory material or technological universes typical of most science fiction — think of the droids and lightsabers that populate the world of Star Wars — but in a singularly fraught metaphysical universe. In Lovecraft’s version of reality, laws seem to function in ways that make our foundational certainties — Euclidean geometry, the private experience of dreams, the inviolable divisions between human, animal, plant, and the nonliving, etc. — merely contingent: just the way things appear to us, rather than absolute necessities.

Read the whole review here.

If you like Lovecraft, this is really quite interesting. —Km

(Source: lareviewofbooks)