I wish there was a better video of this, but I still find it—and other versions  I’ve watched—almost unbearably moving.

                      What else should I be

                           All apologies

Sorrow for those who have left us. Ah, Kurt         In the sun

—KM

lindsayzoladz:

On the shuttle bus that was taking us from Port Authority to the Miley Cyrus concert, which I had affectionately dubbed the Bangerz Express, Jordan, Dombal and I were having a decidedly un-#Bangerz conversation about the lack of effective ways to record interviews on an iPhone. This is what…

Great article about music writing. — KM

chapelofthechimes asked: Re: Angel Olsen... I hear both Leonard Cohen and Cat Power circa 'Moon Pix,' but I also hear bits of Françoise Hardy and Skeeter Davis. Her singing was kind of off-putting to me at first, because she really has a country/folk-influenced voice, but after I listened to her enough it started to become endearing. The emotion of her songs is what I relate to the most, that "hopeless and yet slightly hopeful at the same time" feeling, because I've felt (and still feel) that way a lot in my life.

Sorry it’s taken me so long to get back to you. I get caught up in various things & then lose threads. When I find an artist like Angel who is doing something that I don’t get at first, I usually go back and try again… and I did, with a bigger screen and a better pair of speakers, and I think I am getting her finally. She appears to be another of those voices of your generation who would speak directly to you but I’d have to do a bit of work to get. I know that “happy-sad” feeling you mention & always appreciated artists who could give it to me. What do you think of Lorde with songs like “White Teeth Teens” or “Tennis Court”? Thanks for writing…. all best, Keith

newyorker:

Stacey D’Erasmo argues that, in the course of long artistic careers, women are more likely than men to change form and style, Proteus-like: http://nyr.kr/NTPwA2

“Consider, for instance, the difference in the trajectories of a few pairs of more or less evenly matched leading artists and contemporaries: Joni Mitchell and Neil Young; Toni Morrison and Philip Roth; Roni Horn and Eric Fischl. In each medium—popular music, literature, and visual art, respectively—the woman has broken form, shed a skin, with each phase of her career, whereas the man has returned to ever-deepening iterations of the sound or sentence or imagery with which he began. ”

Illustration by Hannah K. Lee.



This fascinating speculative essay is stuffed with ideas. The one that really gets to me is the notion that the construction of gender is our first art form. As D’Erasmo puts it: “If being a girl means ______ (fill in the blank…), then am I a girl? What is it to be a girl? Do I take the deal or not? Which part? Gender, for many girls in many places, doesn’t fit all that well….  For many boys, the gender that the culture hands them fits fine… They hardly ever think about it. Moreover, why look a gift horse in the mouth?”
Girls then, she says, experience an “alienating distance” that is productive for art, that makes women “protean,” able to continually reconstruct themselves. She adds: “Of course, this alienating distance does occur for some boys…” Having been one of those boys for whom gender was not an easy fit, who was forced to think about it, I understand perfectly the “alienating distance” she’s talking about—difficult for a child and adolescent trying to live his life but a great asset for the adult novelist. These are really interesting ideas that deserve to be explored at greater length.
—KM

newyorker:

Stacey D’Erasmo argues that, in the course of long artistic careers, women are more likely than men to change form and style, Proteus-like: http://nyr.kr/NTPwA2

“Consider, for instance, the difference in the trajectories of a few pairs of more or less evenly matched leading artists and contemporaries: Joni Mitchell and Neil Young; Toni Morrison and Philip Roth; Roni Horn and Eric Fischl. In each medium—popular music, literature, and visual art, respectively—the woman has broken form, shed a skin, with each phase of her career, whereas the man has returned to ever-deepening iterations of the sound or sentence or imagery with which he began. ”

Illustration by Hannah K. Lee.

This fascinating speculative essay is stuffed with ideas. The one that really gets to me is the notion that the construction of gender is our first art form. As D’Erasmo puts it: “If being a girl means ______ (fill in the blank…), then am I a girl? What is it to be a girl? Do I take the deal or not? Which part? Gender, for many girls in many places, doesn’t fit all that well….  For many boys, the gender that the culture hands them fits fine… They hardly ever think about it. Moreover, why look a gift horse in the mouth?”

Girls then, she says, experience an “alienating distance” that is productive for art, that makes women “protean,” able to continually reconstruct themselves. She adds: “Of course, this alienating distance does occur for some boys…” Having been one of those boys for whom gender was not an easy fit, who was forced to think about it, I understand perfectly the “alienating distance” she’s talking about—difficult for a child and adolescent trying to live his life but a great asset for the adult novelist. These are really interesting ideas that deserve to be explored at greater length.

—KM

(Source: newyorker.com)

Don’t Look Now

thenewinquiry:

By 

Fifty years ago today the New York Times made Kitty Genovese the archetypical victim of urban apathy and violence. Now we know just how wrong they were

The original story of Kitty Genovese’s death, first promulgated by the New York Times in a front-page article 50 years ago today—young single woman brutally murdered while 38 strangers watched and did nothing—was incorrect in almost every particular.

The murder itself was horrifying, of course. The Times got that right. But the story that made Genovese a household name and a symbol of modern social dysfunction got nearly everything else wrong. From the number of witnesses to the details of the crime to the timing of the police response, there are by my count no fewer than 29 significant errors in the original Times story, five of them in its very first sentence.

Many of these mistakes have been public knowledge for years, and as the errors in the narrative have been tabulated the incident’s supposed meaning has been subject to ongoing revision. (In recent years the “bystander effect” has replaced “apathy” as the hook of choice.) But with the publication this month of Kevin Cook’s masterful Kitty Genovese: The Murder, the Bystanders, the Crime that Changed America, however, our understanding of the case, and of Genovese as an individual, is immeasurably enriched. Now, for the first time, we can move beyond mere debunking to construct a full and complex narrative of her life and death, and that new narrative reveals the old one as not merely deficient but fundamentally fraudulent. Some of the biggest flaws in the story, it is now clear, come less from what it got wrong than from what it left out.

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Excellent piece. —KM

pilot-star:

Some fanart I did for the magical webcomic Mahou Shounen Fight! This is one of the prints that will be available for kickstarter backers. 

Great!

pilot-star:

Some fanart I did for the magical webcomic Mahou Shounen Fight! This is one of the prints that will be available for kickstarter backers. 

Great!

fehyesvintagemanga:

The anime of Ikeda Riyoko’s The Rose of Versailles in now available on crunchyroll.com !

And a damned fine anime it is, too! —KM

fehyesvintagemanga:

The anime of Ikeda Riyoko’s The Rose of Versailles in now available on crunchyroll.com !

And a damned fine anime it is, too! —KM

Farewell, Rohan O’Grady

Farewell, Rohan O’Grady

june_web

Canadian novelist, Rohan O’Grady, dies at 91is a headline you will not read in any Canadian newspaper. June Skinner, who wrote under that pen name, has never received the recognition her work deserves. She never thought of herself as either a pioneering Canadian novelist or as a unique woman of letters, but she was both. She began publishing when Canadian novels were thin on the ground, and…

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nandarevolution:

Kyary Pamyu Pamyu Is the David Lynch of J-Pop


Kyary hits North America big time! — KM

nandarevolution:

Kyary Pamyu Pamyu Is the David Lynch of J-Pop

Kyary hits North America big time! — KM

(via kyarychan)